G&L Broadcaster

GL Broadcaster
The G&L Broadcaster is a version of the ASAT guitar made by G&L. The really cool thing about this guitar is that you get a certificate stating that Leo Fender inspected it and signed the neck pocket. The significance of the name goes way back to the first Fender production electric Spanish guitar which shared the Broadcaster name. Gretsch owned the name “BroadKaster” and this forced Leo and company to change the name of their original guitar. Naming this guitar the “Broadcaster” was kind of a publicity thing and the legend is that Gretsch again asked that they stop using the name and 800 and something were made before this happened. Others have said that Leo (that’s Mr. Fender to you…!) just got tired of signing the labels. So, pick your myth and we’ll carry on. The G&L Broadcaster is a Telecaster shaped guitar. Very “up town” in it’s all black finish and black hardware. The maple neck has the famous “gun oil tint” and that gives it an old worn in look. The finger board is ebony and pretty flat. The back of the neck has a slight “V” at the nut which flattens out towards the body. GL Broadcaster Headstock GL Broadcaster
The pickups are the large “MFD” type. They have the strong magnets with less windings, hence less inductance which equals a clear full sound. I think maybe this is the pickup Mr. Fender was looking for all these years. The guitar tends towards the bright side, but that is balanced with a good bass response. I really like playing it, shifting the 3 position switch and working the very functional tone control gives you a wide palate. I’d take this to any jam, but because of the “Leo” signature I think this would have to stay at home. What a shame. Nice guitar.

The guitar tends towards the bright side, but that is balanced with a good bass response. I really like playing it, shifting the 3 position switch and working the very functional tone control gives you a wide palate.

Dearmond M77T

Dearmond M77TThe Dearmond M77T was made by the Guild Guitar company. This has the Dearmond/Bigsy tailpiece and the 2K Dearmond pickups. I’ve read that these pickups were made in the USA and shipped to Korea where this guitar was built. Who knows? It also has an adjustable roller bridge. Very cool. If you think of this as a Gretsch, then this is a good upgrade. I can’t find anything bad to say about this guitar. The neck pickup has a nice mellow tone that could be jazz worthy and the bridge pickup does all that trebly Cliff Gallop, early George Harrison stuff. Kinda’ heavy. The neck has a medium “C” carve. Rock on!Dearmond M77T Guitar)

The neck pickup has a nice mellow tone that could be jazz worthy and the bridge pickup does all that trebly Cliff Gallop, early George Harrison stuff. Rock on!

Kalamazoo Bass

Oh we all love the sixties! The Kalamazoo EB Bass is the inexpensive version of the Gibson EB Bass we hear on so many songs from that period. Kalamazoo Bass Guitar Sixties
This one has been played and modified through the years. It has a new pick guard, new tuners and a new nitro finish.Kalamazoo Bass Guitar Sixties
It’s still got it where it counts though with the original pots and Gibson sidewinder pick up. It’s a very light instrument with a smallish guitar-like neck (super easy to play) but the action is a little high and there is buzz on the on “G” string…BUT…when you plug it in… Wow…this Kalamazoo Bass sounds huge, like some monster bass, hard to believe when you’re holding it. There is one more thing to say about the construction for folks looking at these old Kalamazoo guitars and basses. They aren’t wood, well they’re composite bits of wood all glued and compressed together, so don’t think that you can sand one down and come up with beautiful wood grain.

It’s a very light instrument with a smallish guitar-like neck, but when you plug it in… Wow…in sounds huge, like some monster bass, hard to believe when you’re holding it

Heritage H535

Heritage H535 GuitarThe first thing that hits you when you see this thing is just how beautiful it is. The Heritage Company sure knows how to make a pretty guitar. The Heritage H535 a thin semi-hollow with a mahogany neck and single ply binding around the body, the finger board and the headstock, which is fitted with Grover Imperial tuners. The guitar has Schaller pickups, that are hot. I would choose a lower output PAF style pickup myself, but whatever. These pickups need to be lowered to get any nuance. The guitar tends towards the bright end of the spectrum. Heritage H535 Guitar
The neck is a shallow “C” shape. I could get a decent blues sound out of it. The guitar is pretty, but the sound can be quite dirty. By backing off a little on the attack you can still get those ringing 60’s folk rock sounds too, which is a plus.Heritage h535 guitar

The guitar is pretty, but the sound can be quite dirty. By backing off a little on the attack you can still get those ringing 60’s folk rock sounds too, which is a plus.

G&L SC3

This a 1991 G&L SC3, which puts it at the end of the “Leo” era G&L guitars (Leo passed on March 21, 1991). The body shape emulates the “S” style bodies of the past, but is smaller and has deep curves, so the guitar snuggles right up to you and wears very comfortably. G&L 1991 SC3 Guitar It has a very thin neck and curved radius, so you can really get around on it, but folks with larger hands would probably not want to choose this guitar. It has Leo’s “MFD” pickups, which give it a very clear sound.
G&L SC3 1991 guitar
One interesting thing about this guitar is the feel of the neck. I know it’s a regular, thin maple neck, but it feels very stable and stiff. It also attaches to the body with 3 bolts as opposed the traditional 4, which would make you think that it would be less stable, but the joint is so tight it feels like one piece of wood. The fingerboard is a very nicely grained rosewood.
G&L SC3 1991 Guitar

The guitar snuggles right up to you and wears very comfortably. It has Leo’s “MFD” pickups, which give it a very clear sound.